About Us

How VPN began

Virden Pet Network was formed in 2007 by Virden neighbors Heather Reimer (far left) and Bev Bailey (2nd from left) who were troubled by the number of stray cats in town.

They were joined a few years later by rescue manager Kathy Heaman (2nd from right) and fundraising manager Margaret James (far right).

Our Board of Directors:

Heather Reimer; Bev Bailey; Kathy Heaman

We've always believed the most important work is done by the volunteers who foster our rescued pets in their homes, work at our fundraisers, and support us in a million ways. So our board always welcomes new volunteers to join us and help end the problem of homeless pets.

Virden Pet Network became a registered charity under the Canada Revenue Agency in 2008. This meant we became accountable to the federal government and could provide tax receipts to donors.

The organization relies entirely on donations and fundraising efforts for operating funds. 95% of our annual budget goes towards fulfilling our mission of helping pets by providing veterinary care, pet food and supplies.

CRA Charitable Registration Number: 83840 8821 RR0001

Our Mission

Our mission is to help our community in southwestern Manitoba address the problem of feline overpopulation by taking stray cats and kittens into our care, placing them in temporary foster homes, having them treated for emergent conditions, vaccinating and altering, and adopting them into responsible homes. Conduct humane education in community. Provide programs to help prevent unwanted litters and provide a better quality of life for companion animals.

Accomplishments

1. Low Cost Spay Neuter program. A collaboration with Virden Animal Hospital to share the costs of spay-neuter surgeries for dogs and cats owned by limited income individuals and families.

2. Barn Buddies program. Stray cats unsuitable as house pets are altered, vaccinated and offered at a reduced adoption fee to live as farm cats.

3. Alliance with Town of Virden Animal Control to prevent euthanasia of unclaimed animals at the pound by taking them into our care, rehabilitating, providing vet care including spay-neuter, and rehoming.

4. Reducing the incidence of viral feline diseases FIV and FelV in the region by taking infected strays off the streets, providing the vet care they need, and placing them with owners/fosters who understand their special health needs.